Jesus Birth was Not Reason for All to Rejoice

Not everyone was happy.

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men[a] from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising,[b] and have come to pay him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah[c] was to be born. They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet:

‘And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
    are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
    who is to shepherd[d] my people Israel.’”

Jesus posed a threat. His birth was not cause for all to celebrate. For those who enjoyed power at the expense of profiting off others, the Messiah was no welcome citizen. For Herod, this child did not symbolize life because it meant death to his kingdom. What were the chances that the Messiah would actually arise out of this little town as foretold? Certainly he didn’t really expect him to come as a baby. But the Magi’s inquiry about him confirmed his fears. And he was willing to keep his power no matter the cost.

Naomi Hanvey writes, “It’s kind of obvious why we don’t usually see Herod in the Christmas story. We don’t want to complicate the pure, sacred narrative with this subplot of murder and intrigue, right? The image of the nativity creche isn’t quite as picturesque when you add a paranoid king slaughtering children in the periphery.”(http://www.thechristianleftblog.org/blog-home/lets-put-herod-back-in-christmas?fbclid=IwAR0yvpscB4oPj76D-lYhm4cOKG1tkock0oyobBl_Wrh8O3XPxrZxgezoTKE)

But it matters. God’s hand can be threatening to those who find comfort in what the earthly kingdom values. Understanding the whole narrative helps us hear all that God says to us as his hand weaves through the plot. If a baby caused such fear in a ruler, we have to wonder why. When Mary and Joseph are exhorted to flee to a foreign country, we have to wonder why. Jesus’ life was speaking volumes before he could talk.

God speaks to the world through the whole narrative. When we leave out the uncomfortable parts, we miss seeing parts of God’s character and how the story speaks to us today.

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4 thoughts on “Jesus Birth was Not Reason for All to Rejoice

  1. Andrew Budek-Schmeisser

    Kind of glad that Joe and Mary
    did not stop, thinking twice,
    but luckily declined to tarry
    taking angels’ good advice.
    It really must have been a bummer
    to split the hometown scene
    and go to Egypt (was it summer?
    what a hot ride it must have been).
    But Herod, man, he was a psycho,
    killing kids both left and right,
    so the Holies were entitled
    to decamp, and take quick flight.
    Did Joe write back to make it clear?
    “We’re alive – wish you were here.”

    Reply
  2. Bethany V.

    I agree that we need to look at the whole story of Jesus birth. I’ve always found it very significant that Herod didn’t really believe Jesus was anyone special yet he was fearful. He knew his leadership was illegitimate.
    “God’s hand can be threatening to those who find comfort in what the earthly kingdom values.” I need to remind myself of this again and again when I become too comfortable in this world that was not meant to be my home.

    Reply
  3. Tara

    Yes!! THIS: “ God speaks to the world through the whole narrative. When we leave out the uncomfortable parts, we miss seeing parts of God’s character and how the story speaks to us today.” And that quote so so good!

    Reply

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