To My Christian Brothers and Sisters: What’s Become of Our Light?

Last night, as I watched my youngest graduate from Junior High School, my heart was torn.  While I felt joy in the celebration of these kids (many of whom I have known since preschool), I wrestled with the sadness coming from witnessing behaviors minutes before which have become the norm rather than the exception. And not from the kids.

My husband, my older son, my daughter and me came together to celebrate with my son.  I realize that this was Jr. High graduation and some areas of the country do not even consider that event worthy of a ceremony (I didn’t experience it and don’t feel I’m less the person for it.)  However, last night was about celebrating a milestone in a child’s life. As with most milestones, families play an integral part in the support given to reach it and desire to celebrate it together.

Finding four seats together became a daunting task. Although everyone needed a ticket, not everyone’s “party” arrived together. I understand the desire to include extended ticketed family with your group. However, when saved seats have morphed into rows, we need to ask ourselves what’s really at play here. 

We found seats:  I sat alone, my husband and daughter sat several rows back and my son sat in the back row by himself. Meanwhile, the two “saved” seats in back of me never filled. 

As I sat alone, I mourned. First, for the immediate grief of not sitting together with my family. We’ve been through a lot these past few years. My son has encountered the typical Jr. High social challenges, confronted the academic rigors that come with maturity, and dealt with many difficult situations experienced by our whole family. In many ways, we’ve been stretched to our limits for a decade. Last night, it would have been nice to be woven together in our celebration.

I also mourned the small rips into humanity I witnessed earlier in the day in my own community. Two different adults looked at me and continued to cut me off in a parking lot. “Just because you can does not mean you should” has become a well known mantra in our home. My kids have learned that this world is not “all about them.”  Sometimes, we sacrifice for the sake of someone else. It may involve a big act-maybe even their life. Yet, many times, the humility involves the routine moments of asking what can be done to make life better for someone else.  When we cannot even give up an extra minute, who have we become?

How easy it is to explain away those behaviors. We are all stressed. Some days, we wonder how the lists for our days will be accomplished within the 24 hours we are given. Our minds are constantly multitasking; hoping that fulfillment will be found in reaching our expectations. Whatever the cost. But maybe, we need to evaluate what it is we expect: out of our days and out of our lives. Who drives us? What imprint do we hope to leave on another? 

In the fall, I lamented the division in our nation through my post. https://stephaniejthompson.com/2016/11/14/the-hard-work-of-being-neighbors/  Since then, has anything really changed? The trespasses against our neighbors continue-some with loud fanfare; others in a more quiet “sin of omission” manner. Many times these actions are accompanied by the sight of bumper sticker theology and comments justified by the title “Christian.”

When did  loving our neighbor as ourselves become a matter of convenience or preference?

Everyday we have an opportunity to shine a collective light in the moments we have with others. It matters regardless of how big or how old the audience may be when:

treating  waitstaff (despite your frustration)

responding to the annoying neighbor kid (who ironically is perceived as a “trespasser”)

listening to a person who holds a different political view (without unfriending them or tuning them out)

tempted to financially gain from someone else’s loss (just because you can, does it mean you should?)

driving or standing in line (Is your time really more important than someone else’s)

Our natural selves will find it difficult but our transformed selves can embrace the hard. Did we not invite Jesus in to do just that?

Paul exhorts us in this way: “…Be agreeable, be sympathetic, be loving, be compassionate, be humble. That goes for all of you, no exceptions. No retaliation. No sharp-tongued sarcasm. Instead, bless—that’s your job, to bless. You’ll be a blessing and also get a blessing.” (1 Peter 3:8)

Brothers and Sisters: Can we covenant together to let our light shine brighter? 

I know we can do better. Jesus made it so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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