Cleaning up the Mess

Now, what?”

I asked myself a few months ago. After years, consisting of very long days, of family struggles with mental and medical conditions, the season began to change. At first, I dared not believe it. So many times, there had been brief glimpses of light as we forged through the darkness. But, those moments seemed to fade quickly. Once again, we would be left trying to find our footing and walk forward together: my daughter, my two sons, my husband, and myself. To say that the relationships between us were strained would be an understatement. When one person in a family struggles, everyone is affected.

The dynamics between us does not resemble the picture I had in my mind before my husband and I started a family. My daughter began treatment for Bipolar Disorder at 9 years old (she is now age 15). My older son (age 18)has battled anxiety and depression along with a host of unexpected health concerns along the way. The youngest son (age 13), whom I call the “comic relief”, manages mild anxiety. None of their conditions define them, but, they do affect the climate of our home. It hasn’t always felt like the refuge I hoped my husband and I would create. We have tried to initiate traditions, affirm each other’s strengths, and attempt to carve moments of time together We have sought out therapy, utilized resources and developed a support system. Humor has even found its way in. Yet, we couldn’t always keep the storms at bay.

Truthfully, the winds, at times, seemed so forceful that I wasn’t sure I had the strength to resist them. My husband and I could be a strong force together; yet each of us developed our own methods of survival. We also felt as if the storm was invisible to everyone else. When your kids are physically sick, it is usually visible and garners sympathy. However, mental illness carries a stigma. There are plenty of opinions regarding how to “fix” your child. “If we would just……..” Meanwhile, the unpredictible nature of episodes and triggers as well as the financial stress, and school concerns mount. And in the midst of it all, you are trying to sustain your marriage, pay bills and pray for endurance, provision, and healing.

However, it occurred to me one day that this long season of storms may have finally transitioned into a season of calm. When you are so used to living in survival mode, you don’t always realize that the storm has weakened. Weeks no longer seemed packed with doctors’ appointments, evaluating medications, financial distress, school battles, emotional burnout. It may be the beginning of a season of restoration. On the surface, a calm after the storm sounds welcoming. But, truthfully, the implications are daunting.

How do you begin cleaning up the mess?

Branch by branch;piece by piece. I remember a horrific storm that erupted suddenly about 10 years ago. When it was safe, we made our way outside to access the damage. Thankfully, our belongings remained intact. However, our street and our yard were filled with tree limbs and branches scattered everywhere. In order to move toward restoration, you must begin cleaning up the mess one branch at a time. It may take a while. And I’ve learned (reluctantly)that’s O.K.

Restoring our relationships with each other will take time. One branch at a time. I often wonder how my kids would relate to one another had our situation been different. I will never know the answer. It would be tempting to dwell on the “what ifs.” but that would require looking back. We are heading forward. The medical concerns have not resolved. The winds may indeed return. But, we have found space to breathe and rest. We have found our footing once again and set our eyes on God; who is in the business of making things new. I find inspiration in the promise given to the Israelites.

1See, I am doing a new thing!
Now it springs up; do you not perceive it?
(Isaiah 43:19 (NIV)

(This post originally appeared at http://mudroomblog.com/cleaning-up-mess/)

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